“Remembering WWI” App Workshop in Kansas City

Join us at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City on Wednesday, August 2nd, for a free educator workshop to learn about our new World War I app: Remembering WWI. Register on Eventbrite.

Remembering WWI App Welcome screen

Remembering WWI is an iPad and Android app for exploring, collaborating, and engaging with our extensive collection of WWI photographs and moving images, along with contributions from other organizations and individuals. It commemorates the 100-year anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War, and is available in the iTunes and Google Play stores.

In this how-to session, participants will have the opportunity to explore the app and brainstorm with fellow educators how to use it in the classroom.

App developer Historypin will introduce how the app was created to help people explore, use, and reuse newly digitized WWI photographs and moving images. Stacie Petersen from the National World War I Museum and Memorial will highlight the Museum’s primary source contributions to the project.

Workshop Date & Time:
Wednesday, August 2nd
9:30am-11:00 am

Location:
National World War I Museum and Memorial
2 Memorial Drive
Kansas City, MO 64108

Registration:
This workshop is free. Register on Eventbrite.

 

John Bull, the mascot of the 77th Aero Force (Photograph 165-WW-472A-049, National Archives Identifier 45274232)

We hope you can join us for a fun workshop (pastries and coffee will be provided) to learn about the ways you might use some of our nation’s most interesting WWI content in your curriculum.

Please bring an iPad (minimum requirements iOS 9) or Android tablet (minimum requirements Android 5, minimum width 4.3 inches) if you own one, and have the Remembering WWI app downloaded if you can. We’ll have a few tablets available for use.

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Summer Programs at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library

This summer, teachers and students can join us for workshops and programs at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum in Simi Valley, California.

Today’s post comes from education specialist Carina Morgan at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

Film This! 2017

Film This logoJuly 24-28

For: High School Students – any student who will be enrolled in 9-12th grade in the Fall 2017 semester
Cost: $200, scholarship applications available on request
To Register: Email us at reaganeducation@nara.gov with the subject line: Film This

High school students will shoot and edit an original documentary film with the help of film-industry professionals in this week-long film-making workshop. The students will be taught by professional animator and college instructor Eric van Hamersveld, graphic designer and college instructor Sue van Hamersveld, with assistance from actor Atticus Shaffer.

Participants of Film This 2016

Film This! 2016

At the end of the week the students will screen their five-minute films, created using primary source resources from the National Archives collections along with their original footage.

In December they’ll return for the Reagan Library Student Film Festival when awards are given out in categories including Best Overall, Best Editing, and Best Use of Historical Resources. Find more information on the Reagan Library website.

Media Literacy Teacher Workshop

Media Literacy: How to Read the News

July 20

For: Secondary School Teachers, grades 7-12
Cost: Free
To Register: Email us at reaganeducation@nara.gov with the subject line: Media Literacy Teacher Workshop

Elizabeth Smith, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Communication at Pepperdine University, and Mira Cohen, Director of Education at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, will present a workshop for teachers including lesson plans and curriculum. The curriculum includes materials developed by the Reagan Library Education Department as well as the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas.

Dr. Smith will present a lecture on the history of the media in the United States to help teachers prepare their students to understand the context in which contemporary media practices evolved.

The curriculum and lesson plans presented by Cohen will empower teachers to develop their students’ analysis skills as students learn how to look for bias and inaccuracy in reporting.

Teaching History through Artifacts: Titanic at the Reagan

Titanic FlyerAugust 7 & September 30

For: Primary School Teachers, grades K-6
Cost: Free
To Register: Email us at reaganeducation@nara.gov with the subject line: Traveling Trunk Program

The Reagan Library is introducing a traveling trunk program about the Titanic for K-6 educators. These workshops are designed to highlight best practices for teaching with the included primary sources.

Trunks include a complete curriculum for grades K-6​ based on the new CA HSS Framework​. By using the trunk program curriculum, educators will learn how to use the National Archives resources in their curriculum to develop activities and experiential exercises for their students.

Educators may reserve a trunk for their classroom, school or district at this workshop; though you do not have to attend a workshop to reserve a trunk.

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Native Warriors on Both Sides of the Battle of Little Bighorn

As part of our document spotlight series, today we bring you primary sources related to the Battle of Little Bighorn.

One hundred and forty-one years ago, from the evening of June 25, 1876, to dusk on the 26th, General Armstrong Custer and his troops engaged in battle with the Sioux and Cheyenne at the Battle of Little Bighorn in Montana Territory.  As was often the case from the colonial through the expansion eras, Native Americans aligned on both sides of the battle; although in this case, only a few Army Scouts were involved with Custer.

Access Primary Sources in the National Archives Catalog:

Sioux & Cheyenne Leaders at the Battle:

U.S. Army Scouts:

Several detailed accounts of this event and events following can be found across the internet, including:

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Equal Pay for Women

The struggle for women’s rights and equality have been the basis for much legislation through the years. Some have passed the House and Senate, while others have failed. Issues of improving working conditions, entry into occupations formerly held by men, and equal pay for equal work have been addressed by this effort, among many others.

Although tremendous strides have been made in all areas, women’s wages in 2013 still stood at about 79 cents on every dollar when compared to wages for men.  Just a few records from the National Archives and the White House provide a glimpse of this still-continuing process.

Telegram from Ben Woodward to Carl ShipleyNovember 9, 1943 07646_2007_001

Telegram from Ben Woodward to Carl Shipley November 9, 1943 07646_2007_001

The Equal Pay task force report to the President of June 2013 gives a good review of the background of this continuing struggle since 1963, when the Equal Pay act was passed.

Many significant materials can be found in DocsTeach documents and the National Archives Online Catalog that illustrate this ongoing struggle.

Among them are just a few of the materials available:

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Summer Programs Around the National Archives

We have a fun summer planned for both families and educators at our National Archives and Presidential Library locations around the country!


July Fourth

Come to the home of the Declaration of Independence to join us as we celebrate our nation’s birthday!

If you can’t come in person to Washington, DC, join through YouTube and Facebook. Or celebrate at one of our Presidential libraries around the nation.


The “Write” Stuff: Literacy, Writing, and Research Festival for Kids and Families

The “Write” Stuff: Literacy, Writing, and Research Festival at the National ArchivesJoin us — and some of your favorite authors and illustrators — for a free summer writing festival at the National Archives in Washington, DC!

Be a Writer Day for 4th-6th Graders —Friday, July 7. Free! Registration required.

  • Discussion and Q&A with notable authors and illustrators of young adult and children’s literature
  • Book signings by featured authors
  • Author-led hands-on workshops
  • Registration is also available for those outside the DC area who wish to participate in live-streamed events and webinars.

Reading in the Learning CenterFamily Research & Literacy Day —Saturday, July 8. Free and open to all.

  • Story times with special guest readers
  • Author- and illustrator-led activities
  • Live recording of the “Book Club for Kids” podcast with Kitty Felde, and special guest reader, NPR’s Susan Stamberg, with young readers from the Girlfriends Book Club Baltimore!
  • Book signings by featured authors

Family Activities in the Learning Center at the National Archives Museum in Washington, DC


Teaching the Vietnam War through Documents, Photography, and Poetry, from the Academy of American Poets & the National Archives

Soldiers Resting

We have limited spots left for our workshop exploring techniques for teaching about the Vietnam War using primary sources, historical photos, and poetry!

  • Wednesday, July 12 through Friday, July, 14
  • National Archives Museum, Washington, DC

Speakers include Richard Blanco, 2013 Presidential Inauguration poet and Education Ambassador of the Academy of American Poets, and Michael Hussey, National Archives Museum Program Manager.


Primarily Teaching Summer Workshops for Educators

A teacher scans a document during Primarily Teaching.

Join us to conduct research with original documents in the holdings of the National Archives and Presidential Libraries. Discover some of those incredible teachable documents that help educators and students unlock the past and create online learning activities!

Learn more at www.archives.gov/education/primarily-teaching (Limited spots available.)

The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

Truman, Migratory Farm Labor and Immigration
June 26-30
Independence, MO

Register here.

The Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum, and Boyhood Home

U-2 Spy Plane Crisis and its Impact on U.S.-U.S.S.R. Relations
July 17-21
Abilene, KS

Register here.

The National Archives in Washington, DC

Women’s Rights
July 24-28
Washington, DC

Register here (waitlist only).


Elementary Summer Teacher Institute at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum

July 24-29
West Branch, IA

Join the Hoover Library for a week of learning about American Presidents, Iowa Territorial Government, Iowa History, Voting, Citizenship, and how to incorporate primary sources into your elementary classroom.

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Remembering WWI App Workshop

Join the National Archives and Historypin for a free educator workshop on Wednesday, June 21st to learn about our new World War I app: Remembering WWI.

Remembering WWI App Welcome screen

Remembering WWI is an iPad and Android app for exploring, collaborating, and engaging with our extensive collection of WWI photographs and moving images. It commemorates the 100-year anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War, and is available in the iTunes and Google Play stores.

In this how-to session, we’ll introduce the ways the app has been designed to help teachers and students explore, use, and reuse newly digitized WWI photographs and moving images.

Workshop Date & Time:
Wed, June 21, 2017
10:00 AM – 11:30 AM EDT

Location:
The Innovation Hub at the National Archives
700 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, DC 20408

Registration:
This workshop is free. Register on Eventbrite.

John Bull, the mascot of the 77th Aero Force (Photograph 165-WW-472A-049, National Archives Identifier 45274232)

National Archives staff, along with our partners at Historypin, will highlight the primary source content featured in the app. And you’ll get a chance to explore the app and brainstorm with fellow teachers and curators about ways to use this app in your classroom or cultural heritage institution.

We hope you can join us for a fun workshop (pastries and coffee will be provided) to learn about the ways you might use some of our nation’s most interesting WWI content in your curriculum.

Please bring an iPad (minimum requirements iOS 9) or Android tablet (minimum requirements Android 5, minimum width 4.3 inches) if you own one, and have the Remembering WWI app downloaded if you can. We’ll have a few tablets available for use.

Register on Eventbrite.

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Teaching Conflicting Opinions

No group in the United States has been in conflict with European ideas of government longer than Native People. Many of these ideas reflect differing and competing world-views. This is a common problem facing all people at all times – including students in the classroom.

With this in mind, we’ve developed a few lessons to help students understand the necessary steps for understanding and dealing with conflicting opinions.


The Honoring Tribal Legacies Curriculum

Honoring Tribal LegaciesOne of these resources, written as part of our contribution to the Honoring Tribal Legacies curriculum, is an exercise that might be handy to have ready for your classroom.

The lesson “Dealing with Conflicting Ideas first compares two differing accounts of the only violent event that happened during the Lewis and Clark expedition:

After comparing these, students read, debate, and decide upon an open-ended fictional story such as the one below. Students could also be encouraged to write their own stories with undecided and potentially conflicting endings to debate in class, involving whatever subject they’re currently studying.

Peace or Diamonds?

Plant People – A beautiful jar containing a special plant is owned by a group of people who have had it for hundreds of years. When the plant was originally planted in the jar, (which had a bulbous bottom and a narrow top) diamonds were thrown in the bottom of the pot, then dirt, then a seed was planted. It was placed in a special room in the town and carefully cared for. The plant took a very, very long time to grow, but after about a hundred years it was discovered that just sitting in the same room with it made people who were sick become well again. People who were arguing came into the room and could quickly figure out solutions to their problems. Occasionally water dripped from the leaves, which when looked into could help them see the future.

Travelers – A long time later, a group having about five times as many people as the Plant People came to that place. They were very poor. They had no homeland because there had been a great war and their side had lost. They had eaten all the food they had brought with them and they were extremely hungry. Their clothes were ragged and they were very cold.

The Plant People were kind and fed them dinner, but didn’t have enough food to feed them all winter. In order to be kind, the Plant People took one of the Travelers into the room with the plant to help them figure out what to do about their situation. None of the Travelers had ever seen any plant like that before, but they thought it was silly and superstitious to rely on a plant to heal them or help them make a decision. Later, one of the Plant People told one of the Travelers about the diamonds in the bottom of the pot and how it was believed the diamonds were part of the magic.

The leader thought about how many people he could feed with the diamonds and how shoes he could buy. His people were cold and the children were hungry. They had no money to buy the plant, but they offered to buy it anyway. They were told it couldn’t be bought or sold. It had always been there and that was where it needed to stay. 

What happened next?

You can find “Dealing with Conflicting Ideas in the Honoring Tribal Legacies curriculum.

For more information about the Honoring Tribal Legacies handbook and curriculum and how they can be adapted to your classroom, attend our free webinar on Monday, June 5th at either 7 p.m. Eastern or 7 p.m. Pacific. Email us to register.


DocsTeach Bring History to Life National ArchivesDocsTeach Activities

Other examples of classroom approaches to issues of conflicting opinions can be found in DocsTeach ready-made activities. One example that further illustrates the differences between Native and non-Native culture and expectations is: Indian Nations vs. Settlers on the American Frontier: 1786–1788.

Of course, cultural differences are not the only divisions between groups of people. An example that illustrates class difference is Titanic Survivors: One Ship, Two Different Worlds.

For more information about creating your own DocsTeach activities to help students understand the nature of conflict, watch our distance learning page for upcoming professional development opportunities.

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Upcoming PD Webinar: Native Voices from the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Honoring Tribal LegaciesJoin us for a free professional development webinar on Monday, June 5th at 7 p.m. or 10 p.m. EDT to learn quick and easy ways to incorporate the Honoring Tribal Legacies Handbook into your curriculum.

Honoring Tribal Legacies, underwritten by the National Park Service, introduces many unique Native American viewpoints. It builds upon the Bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which was observed from 2003 to 2006.

The curriculum promises to expand your students’ modern cultural understandings, while also greatly informing their study of westward expansion.

Join University of Oregon researcher Dr. Stephanie Wood, editor and major contributor to the Honoring Tribal Legacies Handbook, and National Archives educator Carol Buswell, one of the designers of the seven Honoring Tribal Legacies teaching units.

We offer a one-hour National Archives Professional Development certificate for attending. Some school districts and libraries accept these certificates for required PD credit. Be sure to check with your district in advance.

Suitable for all grade levels. To register, email us at distancelearning@nara.gov

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New Features on DocsTeach

We’re happy to share some recent improvements we’ve made to DocsTeach.org, our online tool for teaching with documents from the National Archives!


New Analyzing Documents Tool

Lewis Hine Photo

We’re very excited about our first new activity tool since we launched DocsTeach almost seven years ago!

Create activities with the Analyzing Documents tool to teach students the process of document analysis:

  • Meet the document.
  • Observe its parts.
  • Try to make sense of it.
  • Use it as historical evidence.

Analyzing Documents activities guide students through primary source documents for contextual understanding and to extract information to make informed judgments. Read more about this tool — or jump right in by creating a new activity and choosing Analyzing Documents as your activity type. Choose the type of document (photograph,
written document, artifact, poster, map, cartoon, video, or sound recording) to set analysis questions for your students.

Check out an example of an activity made with the new tool: Analyzing a Child Labor Photograph


Managing Students’ Responses

My Students' ResponsesWe listened to educators who told us they wanted to use DocsTeach with their students, but weren’t interested in receiving an email every time one of their students completed an activity.

Now you can view your students’ completed activities on the My Students’ Responses page. You can even create groups to organize your students’ work — students will choose from the groups that you set up when they finish their activities. And you can use the new My Response Settings page to turn off email notifications entirely if you’d like.

To test out this feature or change your settings, log in and choose My Account in the menu.


Better Searches

Document SearchWe’ve drastically improved search functionality so that you can more easily find the primary sources and activities that you’re looking for. Now when you search for Vietnam War, for example, you’ll only get results that have both the words Vietnam and War. But we included other options, so you can pick the type of search that you prefer.

We also changed how our search works so that you get the most relevant results first. Searching Chinese Exclusion Act, for example, gives you the actual Act first, followed by documents related to the topic.


Recently Added Documents

As always, we’ve been adding more primary sources – here are some recent highlights, documents from two Supreme Court cases:

Excerpt from Buck v. BellBuck v. Bell – This newly digitized case file concerns the issue of involuntary sterilization and can help students learn about the eugenics movement in the United States. Read more about the case in another recent blog post.

Excerpt from Notice of the Supreme Court Opinion in Worcester v. GeorgiaWorcester v. Georgia – This case established the principle of “tribal sovereignty.” The Supreme Court ruled that states, like Georgia, could not diminish rights of tribes because the Cherokee Nation constituted a nation holding distinct sovereign powers as granted by Congress and the United States.


…and more

We’ve made additional behind-the-scenes updates to improve the overall DocsTeach experience. We hope these changes will make the site easier to use, and an even better tool for bringing history to life. But we always love to hear feedback — so let us know if you have an idea to improve DocsTeach!

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Summer Workshop: Teaching the Vietnam War through Documents, Photography, and Poetry

We’re pleased to add another event to our menu of summer 2017 professional development opportunities!

Teaching the Vietnam War through Documents, Photography, and Poetry
July 12-14, 2017
National Archives, Washington, DCNational Archives, poets.org

Soldiers Resting

Soldiers resting during a search and destroy mission against the Viet Cong (From the Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer)

The National Archives and the Academy of American Poets have partnered to produce a dynamic summer teacher workshop on the subject of the Vietnam War. The workshop will explore our past and present relationship with this conflict and the struggle for peace.

During this workshop, historians, poets, and art educators will guide participants through techniques for teaching about the Vietnam War.

These methodologies will employ three types of source material: 1) primary source documents from the holdings of the National Archives; 2) historical photographs, and 3) poetry. Each provides a different means of getting closer to the truth(s) of the conflict.

Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Tonkin Gulf Resolution (Senate Draft), National Archives Identifier 2127364

Speakers include:

  • Richard Blanco, 2013 Presidential Inauguration poet, Education Ambassador, Academy of American Poets
  • Michael Hussey, Ph.D., Museum Program Manager of the National Archives

All workshop events will take place at the National Archives building in Washington, DC. Attendance is limited to 15 teachers and educators. The workshop fee is $100. Register now.

Draft Schedule

Day One:

  • Speaker introduction and discussion of workshop objectives
  • The Vietnam War: Teaching techniques using primary source documents
  • The Vietnam War: Teaching techniques using historical photographs

Day Two:

  • The Vietnam War: Teaching through Poetry, based on a teaching plan authored by Mady Holzer, Educator in Residence, Academy of American Poets

Day Three:

  • Synthesizing the source material: How to use archival documents, photographs, and poetry together.
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